The 5 best things that will happen to DBAs when SQL server moves to Linux

Posted in: Cloud, Microsoft SQL Server, Open Source, Technical Track

 

In the second half of 2017, SQL Server will start calling Linux its second home. Azure Data Lake for Ubuntu was the sign that Microsoft was serious about going Linux. Private preview is already available for SQL Server on Linux, and this scribe is not part of it but let me wildly guess what would warm the hearts of those DBAs who have played with Oracle on Linux and SQL Server on Windows:

 

  1. Cleanup won’t require sifting through registry entries and cleaning it up. The uninstall would be quick, simple, and a breeze.
  2. No confusion about Windows authentication or SQL Server authentication.
  3. A much much better system utilities for monitoring and root cause analysis.
  4. Boasting and bragging rights about managing an enterprise database on Linux.

 

Probably the most serious thing that will happen with SQL Server on Linux is that more and more Oracle DBAs who prefer to use Linux, will start taking an interest in managing SQL Server.

Pythian is perfectly poised to leverage this change in technology from Microsoft. We have world class SQL Server DBAs, Linux gurus, and some magnificent Oracle DBAs. Existing clients as well as new clients can count on these resources to get their SQL Server databases supported or migrated to Linux.

And of course, it doesn’t matter really whether these database are on cloud or not come 2017, because Pythian has already covered that too.

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About the Author

I have been in love with Oracle blogging since 2007. This blogging, coupled with extensive participation in Oracle forums, plus Oracle related speaking engagements, various Oracle certifications, teaching, and working in the trenches with Oracle technologies has enabled me to receive the Oracle ACE award. I was the first ever Pakistani to get that award. From Oracle Open World SF to Foresight 20:20 Perth. I have been expressing my love for Exadata. For the last few years, I am loving the data at Pythian, and proudly writing their log buffer carnivals.

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