Deploying a Private Cloud at home — Part 6

Posted in: Cloud, Technical Track

Today’s blog post is part six of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying a Private Cloud at Home, where I will be demonstrating how to configure controller node with legacy networking ad OpenStack dashboard for webgui. Feel free to check out part five where we configured compute node with OpenStack services.

  1. First load the admin variables admin-openrc.sh
    source /root/admin-openrc.sh
  2. Enable legacy networking
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT network_api_class nova.network.api.API
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT security_group_api nova
  3. Restart the Compute services
    service openstack-nova-api restart
    service openstack-nova-scheduler restart
    service openstack-nova-conductor restart
  4. Create the IP pool which will be assigned to the instances we will launch later. My network is 192.168.1.0/24. I took a subpool of the range and I am using that subnet to assign IPs to the VMs. As the VMs will be on my shared network I want the ip in the same range my other systems on the network.
    Here I am using the subnet of 192.168.1.16/28
  5. Create a network
    nova network-create vmnet --bridge br0 --multi-host T --fixed-range-v4 192.168.1.16/28
  6. Verify networking by listing the network
    nova net-list
  7. Install dashboard. Dashboard gives you webui to manage OpenStack instances and services. As we will be using the default configuration I am not going in detail with this.
    yum install -y mod_wsgi openstack-dashboard
  8. Update the ALLOWED_HOSTS in local_settings to include the addresses you wish to access the dashboard from. I am running these in my Intranet so I allowed every host in my network. But you can specify which hosts you want to give access.
    ALLOWED_HOSTS = ['*']
  9. Start and enable Apache web server
    service httpd start
    chkconfig httpd on
  10. You can now access the dashboard at https://controller/dashboard

 

This completes the configuration of OpenStack private cloud. We can use the same guide for RackSpace private cloud as it too is based on OpenStack Icehouse, but that is for another time.

Now that we have a working PaaS cloud, we can configure any SaaS on top of it, but that will require another series altogether.

Stay tuned for part seven, our final post in the series Deploying Private Cloud at Home, where I will be sharing scripts that will automate the installation and configuration of controller and compute nodes.

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